January Bike of the Month & Win a Suspension Service

Posted in News Bike of the Month By Shockcraft  20 January 2016 11:30:03 am NZDT

Bike of the Month - January 2016

This month we bring you Lawrence K's Commencal Meta V4 in bright bright yellow, just chilling on a freshly built part of B-line, the newest trail on Bluff Hill and part of the Bluff Hill Enduro.

This frame came from Arrow Bikes in Arrowtown and is built with Manitou Mattoc forks and McLeod rear shock.  Just like Tony's Intense, this McLeod is running the multi-volume King Can and bolted in with Shockcraft Straight Axle hardware. The Mattoc runs the Manitou IRT (infinite rate travel) kit which is tuned for extra mid stroke support.

What you can't see is the prototype Monocrome 41mm screw fit bottom bracket.  We'll let you know more about those when they're ready for production.
 

Win a Shockcraft Suspension Service

We would like your help to get the word out about how well we keep bikes running all over the world. In January, if you provide us with your riding buddy's name & email address (with their permission of course) you will be in to win a Shockcraft Suspension Service.  For full details and entry form click here.

Service of Older Forks & Shocks

Manitou

We get asked a lot if we can service or repair older Manitou forks and shocks. The answer is always Yes.

There are some special challenges as forks get onto 20 years old, but we can usually still keep them running. At the 10 year old mark we are seeing forks and shocks that just need new seals, new oil and some Shockcraft magic to restore to new performance. Normally the only factors that render a fork or shock uneconomic to repair are badly damaged air-cans, shock shafts or damper shafts. Minor damage can often be polished out. Damper shafts are available for most forks from 2004 onwards.


Dougal's 1995 Manitou EFC Full Rebuilt by Shockcraft

Other Brands

To date the oldest forks we've worked on were 94 Rockshox Mag 21SL. These went very well. We have seals still available as well as parts-forks and can offer travel conversion.

The oldest shock we've worked on was a 95 Stratos Strata Shock.  These have internal fibreglass valve plates which don't age well but are still usable for the occasional retro ride.

Older coil shocks generally rebuild very well as long as shafts aren't badly damaged. Older air shocks generally rebuild very well as long as air-can sliding surfaces haven't suffered terminal wear.